{SF} Taste of the Nation – The Best from SF's Chefs

May 13th, 2010 · 1 Comment · Events, San Francisco

TasteofNation

Organizing the the San Francisco Food Bloggers' Bake Sale was not only hugely fun, but also made me (and all the other participants) feel good about helping out Share our Strength. I was further impressed by the breadth of Share Our Strength's fundraising efforts when I learned they also organize a series of culinary benefits around the country called Taste of the Nation.

In about 40 cities around the US and Canada, Taste of the Nation pulls together chefs, wine professionals, and other sponsors to put on a night of mouthwatering food, creative cocktails, music, and fun. All the proceeds from ticket sales go to Share Our Strength, just as with the bake sale.

Attpark

I was fortunate enough to get the opportunity to attend Taste of the Nation San Francisco a couple weeks ago courtesy of Foodbuzz, and I was able to give away an extra ticket to one lucky reader, Allison, who seemed to be enjoying the party as much as I was when I saw her! Taste of the Nation San Francisco took place in AT&T Park, our city's beautiful modern baseball stadium. The club level of the stadium had been transformed into a hall of delights, with chefs from San Francisco's restaurants offering up scrumptious little tidbits and mixologists pouring out some crazy libations! It was like a big, all-you-can-eat buffet dressed up as a an elegant cocktail party – with a thumpin, funk-and-disco tinged soundtrack to book (the fiance wanted me to make sure I gave props to the excellent DJ).

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Calabrian salame crostino by barbacco.

I've been on a bit of a food-event bender lately, as I'm sure some of you have noticed, and in my stuffed-full-belly's opinion, Taste of the Nation was a real winner. I may be a little biased since SF is my hometown, but I thought the creativity and artistry displayed by so many local chefs just as, if not even better, than what I saw at bigger events like Pebble Beach, which showcased celebrity chefs from around the country. San Franciscans are fiercely proud of their food culture, and justifiably so after what I tasted that night.

The best part of the having local chefs as well is that if you love their food, their restaurant is right in town so there's no excuse not to have more of it! The fiance and I were able to get little tastes of some of our favorite restaurants we've been to and ones we've been meaning to go to. All the chefs were also very friendly and enthusiastic – definitely prepared for a food-savvy audience and eager to bring new customers to their places.

Smugglerscove 

Smuggler's Cove, a bar in SF which resembles a cross between Pirates of the Caribbean and a mai tai lounge, was serving up some of their signature rum-based drinks.

Some of the most memorable dishes for me included: Paragon Restaurant's smoked cod and corn chowder (the portions at this event were quite generous; I could have filled up on this gloriously thick chowder alone!); Slow Club's duck rillettes with red onion and kumquat marmalades (now on the top of my list of restaurants to go to);  Aziza's chicken liver mousse topped with strawberries and balsamic (decadence perfectly executed); and Piperade's egg salad with marinated sardines (so fresh and flavorful).

Duckrilletts 

Duck rillettes from Slow Club.

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This shot of marinated sardines on chopped egg salad is a little out of focus because I was drooling too much to keep a steady hand on the camera.

Of course I also had to check out the sweet offerings, which didn't disappoint: a shot of Valrhona chocolate pot de creme bliss, topped with a pistachio macaron, from Mayfield Bakery; cute little mini cones of pomegranate martini sorbet and creamsicle martini ice cream from Silver Moon (they were auctioning off a chance to create your own custom ice cream flavor at the event!); and Elizabeth Faulkner's rainbow of macarons, in raspberry, dulce du leche, and blood orange.

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Chocolate pots de creme with pistachio macarons from Mayfield Bakery.

The Taste of the Nation event was three hours long – seems like plenty of time to pace oneself but due to all the food being so tasty and the portion size so generous I felt like I would burst! Fortunately we were able to slip outside, relax for a bit, and sip a beer underneath the stars, enjoying the cool San Francisco air and the slightly clandestine thrill of being in a mostly-empty ballpark.

Macarons
Elizabeth Faulkner's crayon-bright macarons.

If it wouldn't have been the most gauche thing ever I would have totally brought some takeout containers and taken away some of the leftovers for later! However the event appeared to be a rousing success as several chefs ran out of food and shut down their stations before official closing time! I thought this was one of the best-run events I 9;d been to in a while – plenty of happy, well-dressed people but not overcrowded; beautifully crafted food and the chance to learn more about many of the stars of the SF dining scene, and the knowledge that everyone there was contributing to the same cause. I had a great time if Taste of the Nation comes around to your part of town, I think you'd have a fab time as well! See Taste of the Nation page for more information, and note you can also sign up to volunteer at the events!

Disclosure: I was given two tickets from Foodbuzz to attend Taste of the Nation San Francisco.

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Where Strawberries Come From

May 2nd, 2010 · 12 Comments · Events

 

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Ok, a couple weeks late, but I wanted to do a recap of my visit to the land of strawberries – or, at least, the next best place – Cassin Ranch in Watsonville, a producer of berries for Driscoll’s.

The plastic clamshells with the Driscoll’s label are a familiar sight in grocery stores in the Bay Area, but as they were “supermarket berries” I never gave much thought to where they came from. All that changed when I was offered a spot on a group tour of Cassin Ranch, where I’d get to learn about what goes into growing a perfectly succulent, luscious strawberry.

Cassin Ranch is located in Watsonville, just above Monterey, close enough to the ocean to receive the fog, ocean breezes, and chilly temperatures necessary to grow strawberries. Above is the stunning view of the foothills behind the ranch – so verdant and springlike!

Montereyhills

Our hosts were Patrick, one of Driscoll’s berry farmers, and Phil, who works in Driscoll’s R&D developing new varieties of strawberries. Although Driscoll’s grows and sells strawberries, blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries, the largest crop at Cassin Ranch is strawberries, so that was the berry we focused on that day.

Although the containers at the supermarket may just say “Strawberries”, there are in fact thousands of varieties of strawberries grown, and even more being cultivated and studied at Driscoll’s berry farms. Strawberry varieties are developed and chosen for several factors, including taste, shape, and shipping strength.

Phil (who, by the way, has one of the coolest job titles ever – Strawberry Breeding Manager), has the enviable task of taste-testing the results of his research. He says that he has tasted up to 180 berries a day, determining the ones that are most delicious (highly scientific criteria, he admits).

The fruits of his research were undeniable, though, in the gorgeous display of fresh-picked strawberries arranged for us to sample, every berry irresistibly ruddy, plump, and perfectly formed. Although different strawberry varieties are grown at Cassin Ranch, after harvest all the containers of berries are combined together, so which variety ends up at your store is unknown to the customer. However, at the ranch, where several varieties were presented separately for us, it was really easy to see the differences between them.

One of my favorites was the San Juan variety, a classic that’s been around for years, as Phil explained. They had the iconic strawberry shape, full and plump, tapering to a point without being too long or conical, and their taste was pure sweetness, the way I imagine strawberries taste when I’m missing them. (I asked Phil if there were specific terms for describing how different strawberry varieties taste, but he said no, so I don’t feel too bad for my less-than-technical descriptions!)

Another interesting one was the Takara variety, which was specially developed for the Japanese market. In accordance with their passion for aesthetics, the Japanese wanted a small, not too ripe berry that was very uniform in size and would not leak too much juice, for use in their desserts. Hey, there’s a market for those berries here too  – what about all of us bakers and dessert lovers in the US!

There were also mystery “test” varieties only labeled by code numbers, ones that might one day be selected to be grown commercially. It can take years for a test variety to make it from research garden to small test plot to being chosen to include in Driscoll’s crops – these people take the quality of their strawberries very seriously.

Whitestrawberries

Another fascinating strawberry-in-progress was a white strawberry – it may look unripe but it tastes fresh and woodsy. Phil said they were developing this strawberry for a potential market in weddings and fancy events. Once you get over the fact that these aren’t anemic berries, I can see how they could add an unusual and elegant touch to a dessert presentation. Not available yet, though!

Patrick, a third generation berry farmer, stepped to elaborate on the strawberry growing process. Strawberries are planted every year to two years, a selection of varieties based on the farm location and its weather and soil conditions. Patrick and other farmers must constantly monitor the changing environment to determine how the plants are doing and make the appropriate adjustments.

Strawberries take about 30 days to mature. Then, they are handpicked in the field and packed directly into the clamshell containers. Patrick offered a tip to picking strawberries – snap, don’t pull. He figured that on average a field workers is able to pick 6 1/2 to 7 cratefuls of strawberries in containers per hour. The fastest Patrick has seen is 20 crates an hour – that’s amazing! To ensure that quality does not suffer, the containers of strawberries are inspected after they have been moved to the chiller to make sure they are the correct weight and also do not have damaged berries.

Chilling strawberries after they are picked helps extend their shelf life. Strawberries you pick up from the store should last at least a week in the fridge without going bad. We took home a pack of strawberries from the ranch that had likely been picked that very morning; I noticed that they definitely stayed fresher for longer in our refrigerator. If only I lived a little closer to the ranch…

Raspberryjackpatrick

We also got to see some of the raspberry plants at the ranch. A lone red raspberry nestling among the leaves. At right, Phil and Patrick, our uber-gracious hosts, pose for a photo.

I left the ranch happy to have learned a little behind the boxes of strawberries I see in the supermarket, and impressed at the passion of Phil and Patrick for their berries. Although I love strawberries, I’ve not devoted my life to understanding and caring for these wonderful little berries like they have, and it’s nice to know that thanks to them and thousands of others like them, we’ll keep getting these beautiful little fruits to enjoy!

Strawberryfields

Strawberry fields forever. Thanks to Driscoll’s and Cassin Ranch for letting us get a peek at where strawberries come from!

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At part of the invitation to visit Cassin Ranch, I was also generously offered the chance to attend the Grand Tasting at the annual Pebble Beach Food and Wine, just down the road in Monterey.

The third iteration of this foodie-and-oenophile event was chock-a-block with wines from around the world and renowned chefs cooking up delectable bites to sample. The tasting tent was overwhelmingly flush with the sounds of music, wine being poured, and sizzling pans.

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Angela Pinkerton of Eleven Madison Park’s strawberry and rhubarb with buttermilk sorbet and black pepper; soft shell crabs being prepared for Paul Bartolotta (Bartolotta di Mare)’s dish with octopus salad.

There are already plenty of writeups for Food and Wine, so I won’t repeat them, just say that if you’ve got the spare cash it’s definitely worth trying out once – especially if you’re a wine lover. There were so many wines there it was impossible to try them all in the three-hour event, especially if you’re trying to focus on running around sampling all the food. It also helps if you know a little about wine or what particular wineries or styles you’re interested in. I am a huge dessert wine fan (surprise!), and these were a few of my favorites there:

 

Far Niente 2005 Dolce – A Napa winery that decided to solely dedicate part of its vineyards to creating a late harvest wine. Dolce is the local answer to Sauternes or Tokaji, a lush mix of Semillon and Sauvignon Blanc, with citrus and peach notes, pleasantly thick but not overly syrupy.

Grgich Hills 2006 Violetta – I’ve been waiting for the Violetta to return since the 2003 release, and this one is a beauty – like pure honey, with almonds and peaches. Ambrosial.

Jorge Ordonez 2005 Malaga Victoria – I haven’t had the chance to try many Spanish dessert wines – there’s a lot of orange and caramel to this one, and very, very sweet.

Tokaji Classic (Loradona Wine Cellars) – This classic dessert wine from Hungary hardly needs more effusive praises, but I was happy to find it being distributed by local Loradona Wine Cellars. Apparently one of the owners likes it so much he wanted to include it in his inventory. Always a pleasure to get a sip of this old favorite!

 

Disclosure: I visited Cassin Ranch and Pebble Beach Food and Wine as part of a press trip sponsored by Driscoll’s.

P.S. I forgot to mention that the winner of the Taste of the Nation ticket was Allison Daugherty – when I saw her at the event, she seemed to be having a great time! Another food and wine event I need to recap – I know, my life’s been so rough lately!:)

 

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Taste of the Nation San Francisco – Win a Ticket to Go!

April 21st, 2010 · 21 Comments · Events, Giveaways, Uncategorized

TasteofNationlogo
 

Besides creating the Great American Bake Sale (the San Francisco Food Bloggers' Bake Sale I just organized was part of this nationwide event), Share Our Strength also spearhears several other events to draw attention to the problem of childhood hunger. One of the these other events is Taste of the Nation, billed as "the nation's premier culinary event dedicated to ending childhood hunger in America."

Spread over 30 cities across the US, Taste of the Nation features nights of festivity with top chefs, winemakers, and mixologists serving up luscious dishes, delectable wines, and intriguing cocktails. Nibble and imbibe, participate in a wine toss, or bid in a silent auction on tempting food-related prizes. All the proceeds from ticket sales and the events go back to Share Our Strength, to help in the fight against childhood hunger.

Taste of the Nation San Francisco will happen next Thursday, April 29, and will spotlight food from some the Bay Area's brightest culinary luminaries, including Traci des Jardins of Jardiniere, Matthew Accarrino of SPQR, and Elizabeth Faulkner of Citizen Cake. I was lucky enough to score two tickets from Foodbuzz, to attend the event as one of their Featured Publishers! So expect to see a report on this event on Dessert First!

However, even more exciting it that one of you readers can experience it with me! Foodbuzz has given me an extra ticket to raffle off, and I need to give it away by this Friday!

The Taste of the Nation San Francisco event is Thursday, April 29, from 6:30 to 9:30 at AT&T Ballpark. Obviously you will have to be able to get yourself to the event. For all my readers who aren't in San Francisco, I'm very sorry and I promise I'll have another raffle that you can all enter very soon!

Since time is short, I'll make it simple to enter: simply follow my Twitter feed. Post your twitter handle in the comment box below so I can verify that you're following. If you're already following me, you can also post your twitter handle and enter!

I'll pick a winner at random on Friday at noon. So get a-typin!

Tickets for Taste of the Nation can also be purchased here. If you live outside of San Francisco, check the events page to see if there is another Taste of the Nation event near where you are. Events are happening from now through July.

Here's another chance to help in the fight against childhood hunger – and have some fun in the process!

TasteofNation

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San Francisco Food Bloggers' Bake Sale – This Saturday!

April 15th, 2010 · 3 Comments · Events, San Francisco

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I know, where have I been? Preparing for the first San Francisco Food Bloggers' Bake Sale, this Saturday!

As a reminder, I and over 25 wonderful food bloggers will be selling our homemade cakes, cookies, tarts, pies. breads, and much more to raise funds for Share Our Strength, a national organization dedicated to ending childhood hunger! If you are near San Francisco this Saturday, please stop by to say hi and support us!

For an example of what we'll be selling, see my fellow food blogger Lisa's fab macarons!! I must state now, the food blogger community in the San Francisco Bay Area is amazing. I am truly astonished and grateful for how many bloggers and bakers, many whom I've never met before, responded to my call and offered to bake up goodies and help out. Food really does bring people together!

As a double bonus, we are holding the bake sale at Omnivore Books, the most fabulous bookstore in San Francisco for food lovers, and Rose Levy Barenbaum will be speaking at 3 PM! How can you miss it?

And a last-minute enticement! Chicago Metallic has generously donated some bakeware that we will be auctioning off! Need a new brownie pan or cupcake tin? Come by for your chance to win!

San Francisco Food Bloggers' Bake Sale

This Saturday, April 17, 12-3 PM

Omnivore Books

3885 Cesar Chavez St.

San Francisco, CA 94131

And if you can't make it, may I humbly suggest a contribution at our team page? Just click on "Make a Gift" to donate! I and all the food bloggers of the bake sale thank you!

Thanks all for your support! After this weekend, it'll be back to regularly scheduled programming – I have a report on Pebble Beach Food and Wine and a visit to Driscoll's Berry Farms I can't wait to share!

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{SF} San Francisco Chocolate Salon – A Second Go Around

April 1st, 2010 · 14 Comments · Events, San Francisco

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Remember the San Francisco Chocolate Salon I attended last year? A gathering of some of best artisan chocolatiers from near and far, and all the chocolate you could handle? Well, I was lucky enough to be invited back this year as a judge. Which meant that for about three weeks I had regular deliveries of chocolate samples showing up at my door. I felt like I'd inadvertently subscribed to about 50 chocolate-of-the-month clubs by mistake – a very delicious mistake, mind you. And no need for jealousy: tickets were readily available to the salon, and when we went a weekend ago, there were plenty of chocoholics tasting some of the best chocolatiers from around the country. I am constantly astonished at the continued rise in quality and innovation in the chocolate/confection industry – and how happy everyone gets around chocolate. How can you not smile when you have someone offering you a tray of chocolate?

With about 20 categories ranging from best dark chocolate to best comfort food product, there was a lot of tasting and a lot of decision-making to do. Fortunately we had a few weeks to taste the samples, which was a good thing or even I might have passed out from chocolate overdose! On the plus side, I now have a new list of favorites and plenty of recommendations to give to anyone looking for a chocolate fix! I'm not going to reveal my choices for the salon, but I do want to share some of my personal favorites from the long, extensive, and intensive tasting. Warning: plenty of theobroma cacao ahead!

Altereco

Alter Eco Chocolate, dedicated to developing and distributing fair trade food products from across the globe. They have an intriguing lineup of bars, and I got to sample three. The cacao used in these chocolate bars is harvested from a small, traditional-farming cooperative in the Bolivian Amazon.

The Dark Chocolate Blackout (85%) is Alter Eco's darkest, purest bar for those dark chocolate fanatics. The bar is beautifully made, just on the thicker side for bars(for my preference), the with a clean,crisp snap – as Alter Eco bars are made in Switzerland, they've got the imprint of the Swiss expertise with chocolate-making all over them. The chocolate is very pleasantly smooth, with a dry, slightly fruity finish. An excellent choice for anyone who's a dark chocolate purist.

If you a fan of "crunchies" in chocolate (Nestle Crunch was always one of my favorites when I was little), the Dark Chocolate Quinoa (61%) is a must-try. Quinoa mixed into the chocolate(you can see the generous proportioning in the photo above) gives it a nice crunch while you can still taste the rich chocolate – for 61%, it's still surprisingly robust. Although it's clearly of a higher class than a Nestle bar(i.e. meant to be savored slowly), I could still eat this whole bar in one sitting.

I really, really like the Dark Chocolate Velvet – it may be the elusive detente between dark and milk chocolate. Personally I am not a fan of most milk chocolate, but this bar, a mix of dark chocolate and a "touch of milk", captures the wonderful creaminess of milk chocolate while muting the dairy flavor to a sweet undercurrent. The mouthfeel is amazingly buttery. Definitely a standout – I would say whether you love, hate, or are indifferent to milk chocolate you should still give this a try!

Amano

I feel a little redundant including Amano, since it's been a heavy favorite at chocolate shows; however, it's just such great chocolate that I can't help but gush about it to anyone who will listen. Their original Ocumare bar was one of my favorite bars at the old chocolate shop/bakery cafe I used to work at. Amano has been steadily expanding its line, and I wanted to mention the highlights: Dos Rios (70%), with cacao from the Dominican Republic, is a gorgeous spicy orchard in your mouth, very fruity, tasting of bergamot oranges and cloves, and luxurious full finish. It's the orange-striped one in the top left corner if you're looking for it. Montanya(70%) is a limited edition bar made with beans from small family plantations in Northern Venezuela (the light green one in the bottom left corner). This is just a fantastic bar. The flavors are delicate but concentrated, a complex mix of apricot, nuts, and marshmallow, sweet and with a dry finish that hits you in roof of your mouth, near the back. It makes me think of fruit trees just starting to blossom in the first flush of spring. I suggest if you want to try Amano, get three or four of their different bars – it'll be pricey but worth it. It's really eye-opening to see how different all their bars are, and how they've crafted each one to express the individual notes of their bean origins. Amano also includes tasting notes with their bars, so you can tell how serious they are about their chocolate. Taste one of their bars and you'll realize that "dark" and "bitter" describe nothing about a really well-made chocolate bar. I can't love this company enough.

Amella 

Amella's Cocoa Butter Caramels get my vote for one of the most unique products at the salon. Soft caramels made from cocoa butter and flavored with fruits and vegetables, then dipped in chocolate. I admit I was a little overwhelmed by the melange of concepts when I first saw them – what would they taste like? But they turned out to be wonderful little caramels with deep flavors and great texture. I admit there were a lot of caramels at the salon – at one point it seemed I had tried so many sea salt caramels I felt like I'd eaten a salt lick! Preferences for caramels can vary widely – do you like your firm, chewy, gooey, sticky? Amella's caramels are a lovely compromise – firm but not so hard you have to yank with your teeth to get a bite, with embarrassing threads of caramel trailing off. You can bite through these caramels quite easily, and they soften up quickly in the mouth, releasing a medley flavors.

I included these caramels mostly because I was fascinated by the carrot cake caramel. It seemed like such a odd idea – plus, dipped in white chocolate, I was afraid it would be a too-sweet confection. However, it tastes like a really good carrot cake: a mix of carrots, pecans, and cinnamon in a vanilla-scented caramel. Again, I like the caramel texture – firm enough to hold its shape, pleasingly chewy in the mouth. Excellent, highly recommended. The other flavors are more conventional but equally flavorful: a black forest with tangy cherries mixed into dark chocolate, and passion fruit, with the intense fruit tucked into milk chocolate. Congrats to Amella for creating such lovely caramels!

Gateauganache 

I also noticed a trend of homemade gourmet marshmallows at the salon – and a far cry from the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man they are! The prettiest marshmallows I saw had to be Gateau et Ganache's – adorable blossoms in pastel hues with a chocolate button in the center. Charmingly named "guimauves de printemps" (Spring marshmallows), they are flavored lemon, passion fruit, and strawberry and a loevely addition to the Easter table! They were pleasingly thick and springy, swooningly fluffy to the bite, and sweet without being cloying. The head pastry chef of Gateau et Ganache, Anni Golding, studied at L'École Lenôtre and L'École du Grand Chocolat Valrhona in France, and it really shows in her darling confections and perfectly formed chocolates. Shown in the box are, from top to bottom and left to right, milk chocolate cinnamon, white chocolate passion fruit(yum), dark chocolate caramel, and lavender earl grey (sweet and smoky). Beautiful boutique chocolates.  

Vice

My prize for sexiest packaging would go to Vice Chocolates for their sophisticated purple and black scheme and the beautiful reptile-patterned boxes tied with purple ribbon. I love the high, narrow design: it's truly like opening a jewel box to discover treasures hidden in the layers of tissue paper. The chocolates are flat out gorgeous as well: impeccably enrobed and decorated with luster dust and gold leaf. The flavors are offbeat but intriguing – I particularly liked the Scarlet (strawberry in dark chocolate), the Empress (jasmine and lychee), and the Salty Dog (salted caramel, done to gooey perfection). They also had a very unusual but very delicious fig and anise chocolate bar – I really love when these unexpected chocolate pairings work out so well!

Williamdean 

William Dean was another stunner – his box of chocolates looked like a rainbow paintbox. The chocolates are so perfectly formed, with perfect swoops and rounded corners, the decorations brushed on just so. William Dean Chocolates is based in Florida, which might help explain the tropical-fantasy colors and flavors: Key Lime (the parrot-green round one, second from right on top), Cherry-Cranberry Pie (the red flowers, top right corner), Cassis Crunch (purple floral, top left corner, and Mexican Mango (leopard spots, bottom left) were among my favorites. The top half of the photo shows the true work-of-art matcha bar – I wasn't sure whether to bite into it or to frame it!

Other chocolates that tickled my tastebuds:

Divine 70% Dark Chocolate with Raspberries

Malie Kai Dark Chocolate Nibby Bar

Saratoga Chocolates -raspberry truffle(with Bonny Doon Framboise!) and valencia orange truffle

Thanks to all the chocolatiers that participated in the San Francisco Chocolate Salon and sent tasting samples to me and all the other judges.

So next time you need a chocolate recommendation, let me know! Or maybe I'll throw a chocolate-tasting party next year…

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National Food Bloggers' Bake Sale – In San Francisco!

March 22nd, 2010 · 4 Comments · Events, San Francisco

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I have some more exciting news to share – I'm going to be part of the very first National Food Bloggers' Bake Sale, which is part of the Great American Bake Sale.

The Great American Bake Sale is a campaign created by Share Our Strength, a national organization dedicated to ending childhood hunger. On April 17, bake sales will be held everywhere across the nation, with the proceeds donated to Share Our Strength.

Gaby of What's Gaby Cooking came up with the excellent idea of mobilizing food bloggers to lend their numbers to this worthy cause. Check out her site for the list of food bloggers who are heading up bake sales in their various states.

I will be hosting the San Francisco Food Bloggers' Bake Sale, and I'm happy to announce that it will take place at Omnivore Books, the preeminent destination for food literature-lovers in the city! In a wonderful coincidence, I have learned from Celia, the store's owner, that Rose Levy Beranbaum will be speaking at Omnivore Books on April 17 as well! Come hear a pastry goddess speak, buy a cookbook, purchase a pastry and fight childhood hunger – how could you accomplish more on a Saturday afternoon?

What are the San Francisco Bake Sale details?

When: Saturday, April 17, 12-3 PM

Where: Omnivore Books, 3885 Cesar Chavez Street, San Francisco, CA 94131

How can you help?

If you live in the Bay Area and you want to participate in the bake sale, please e-mail me at pastrygirl.dessertfirst@gmail.com! It doesn't matter if you have a food blog or not, only a desire to bake! I need volunteers to help bake up goods to sell, and I would love a chance to meet all you local foodies! Bring a plate of cookies or a cake, whatever you feel like contributing!

If you aren't able to bake up something, please come by and help support us! Purchase something yummy and make a donation to Share our Strength!

If you don't live near San Francisco but would still like to participate, check Gaby's page to see if there's another bake sale going on near where you live.

Also, to all my readers who don't live in San Francisco, if you would also like to make a direct donation, I would be very thankful, and you can be proud of contributing to a wonderful cause!  My team page is here - click on "Make a Gift" to donate.

Here is some additional information on Share Our Strength and The Great American Bake Sale.

As a food blogger, I realize how fortunate I am to have the luxury to bake whatever I dream up in my kitchen and write about it. Many children in this country do not even enjoy three meals a day. Let's use this opportunity and our shared love of food to help out those less fortunate than us.

Thanks for all your support and help! I'll have another post up later this week about my experiences at the Chocolate Salon!

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